Frequently Asked Questions

1. How old do I have to be to volunteer?

Our positions require volunteers to be 18.

2. How do I find out more about volunteering?

Please visit https://www.boxerluv.org/volunteer/volunteer for more information. Once you complete your volunteer application, you’ll hear back from our Volunteer Coordinator to discuss how you can get involved and answer all your questions.

3. Where do the Boxers in your rescue come from?

In many cases, families give up their Boxers. Sometimes family situations change (births, deaths, moves, financial trouble), and families may think they have to give up all commitments to get through the rough times. Unfortunately that sometimes includes the family pet.

Other times, we take in Boxers from bad living situations or get them as strays that no one ever claims.

Sometimes Boxers lose their homes simply because not enough thought was given to the level of commitment and training it takes to own a dog, especially a puppy or very young dog

4. Why do all the pets in my home have to be spayed or neutered?

In rescue, we see hundreds (if not thousands) of animals euthanized every year because of overpopulation of dogs and cats. Therefore, we feel that we are obligated to help educate the public about this widespread crisis and encourage all potential adopters to be responsible pet owners. Responsible pet ownership means keeping your pets in good health, current on vaccinations, and spaying and/or neutering all pets in the home.

5. What happens to the dog once Boxer Luv has rescued it?

First, the new dog gets a health exam. This includes complete lab work, including Heartworm, Tick Fever, and desert diseases like Valley Fever. All necessary procedures are done to discover any underlying health problems or injuries. All illness and injuries are treated before adoption. When deemed healthy for surgery, they are spayed or neutered. Our rescues are assessed for behavior issues, and we  work on identified issues in foster homes and with trainers.

Only when the dogs are, to the best of our knowledge, in good health, are they adopted to the public.

6. What is the adoption process?

  1. Email info@boxerluv.org if you feel your home is a good match for one of our Available Dogs. https://www.boxerluv.org/adopt/available-dogs
  2. An adoption counselor reviews the information you provide, and if believed to be a good match, instructions for the application are sent to you.
  3. Then, an adoption counselor will call you for a telephone interview.
  4. Next a home visit is done by a Boxer Luv Volunteer to further assess your lifestyle and living situation for the dog’s safety, and also to assess the family’s wants and needs more specifically, so that an ideal match is made.
  5. An adoption appointment to meet the dog is set up.
  6. At the adoption appointment, if you like and want to adopt the dog, an adoption contract is signed. If you fail to comply with any item you initial on the contract, at any time during the life of the dog, then Boxer Luv has the right to confiscate the dog.

7. How much does it cost to adopt and what does the cost cover?

The donation to adopt one of our dogs varies depending on age and other considerations. The average donation fee is $300. This goes towards our dogs’ medical costs, including spays, neuters, and vaccinations and microchip.

When we get puppies into rescue, they have a higher adoption fee. This helps to pay for the added costs of puppies’ spays and neuters, after-care for mom, vaccinations, as well as puppy food, wee-wee pads, worming, and other essentials. As you can see, these costs far exceed the donations received.

8. We want a puppy, but we don’t see any on your site. Where can we get one?

We do not refer to any breeders. We rarely have puppies available, an if available would be on the Available Dogs page https://www.boxerluv.org/adopt/available-dogs. We do, however, have Boxers who are still young (as Boxers do not mature until approximately 3 years of age) but are already past the house-breaking and chewing! We would ask that you open your heart and mind a bit and consider adopting one of these young, exuberant “toddlers” into your home.